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Discussion Starter #1
Hello to fellow forum members and casual viewers.
i currently drive a 08 JK wrangler sport, 2.8ltr VM Diesel, coupled to the 6 speed Manual.
picking up the 2014 Grand Cherokee Laredo 4x4 Diesel this coming Friday at noon, at least that's what i have been told.;)
am looking forward to being able to have a sensational on road drive to my favorite off road locations. love the wrangler, but with such vast distances to cover in australia to go pretty much anywhere, the ride in the JK can be sometimes a little tiring fighting with the tiller traversing badly worn roads.
i am looking forward to reading/viewing any and all information regarding aftermarket front, rear and side bar work, and suspension lifting.
cheers to all.
 

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Welcome to the Jeep Diesel Forum! It's been pretty quiet here the last few months, but we are finally getting closer to release so we should have more information up soon.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
are diesel cars/trucks/vehicles more expensive to run in the states?
fuel costs?
servicing?
road taxes?
i have the impression that "diesel" motor vehicles are terribly unpopular over there. do people conjure images oil oil burning semi-trailers, from 20 years back and cargo ships belching clouds of smoke and fumes all over the shop?
 

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I own, and have driven diesels here in US and in Oz - I am a believer.
I think GoldenGoat has identified part of the US aversion to diesels - crude, smelly, smokey et cet. Even though longer true - this is just an excuse.
I think there is another level to it.
It comes from a national sense that Detroit put the gasoline engine into being, and that loyal Americans can support no other type of motor.

Too bad that these narrow minds cannot understand that the US has also done lots to develop and find applications for diesel engines all around the world. Take a look at GM, Cummins, Fairbanks-Morse, Caterpillar; Colt-Pielstick, LeRoi-Dresser et cet.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
cheers irondragon.
i had not considered the detroit connection. i was under the impression that detroit was a great, but yesterday city?
like kyoto in japan and pottery? (although kyoto is still a big name in pottery)
the states is a sensational place to be (i have never been my brother has visited a dozen times or more and raves excitedly about every trip, maybe its the MEGA sizing thing), i thought the people were more open to change/different ideas, after all america hasn't become great by being a bunch of redneck yahoos, it is the hub of the industrialised world with output per person far exceeding the output of rising industrial/economic powers of late, everything going for it, resources, brainpower, the people, the beauty of the country. and like you stated huge names like caterpillar, cummins etc... diesel innovators!
maybe it is just a time thing.
cheers again for the comments?
 

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Perception is a big part of it. The pathetic attempt at offering diesel engines by the US auto industry in the 1980's did nothing to improve that perception.

For US automakers, they build what they know they can sell in high volume and make a profit on. For the majority of US drivers it boils down to the following...

Most do not tow, haul heavy loads or offroad. The gas engine is perfectly adequate and still more financially economical for their occasional need to do so.

Gas is still cheaper than diesel and still more readily available.

The additional cost of buying a diesel ($5000 US on a Grand Cherokee, for example) and the associated expenses of maintaining one is prohibitive to most people. The fact that most diesel offerings in the US are only offered on the more expensive and higher trim level vehicles drives it further out of reach for the average person.

Most people don't keep their vehicles long enough or put high enough annual mileage on them to justify a diesel. Under those circumstances any savings from a fuel economy standpoint doesn't overcome the higher cost of ownership. It's just basic math.
 

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Basic math is at best boring.... I prefer Boolean algebra... it's way more flexible... Don't think cost per gal. think cost per mile.... diesel wins. Don't think American automakers... think European automaker using american workers to put an Italian diesel on an German chassis. And if you were going to get a Grand Cherokee 8 cylinder to pull your trailer anyway it's only 2500 dollars more... not 5000. Perspective is reality.... and sometimes reality can be changed simply by moving to the other side of the stadium.
 

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LOL... you don't need to strain yourself over the math. For the majority of people, simple math will show that the cost per mile doesn't justify it.

The people who truly want one will get one regardless of that reality.
 

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Perhaps you are correct (not likely). But I could wake up some day thinking "Could've had a V8".

I think that if you are not towing or doing some serious rock climbing/mud wallowing you are correct. But that's not the target audience. It's people like me who wan't to tow there trailer into the sunset and not worry about an occasional mountain pass. Then drop by the Old Country Buffet for diner. One that is not a truck. What are the options?

This forum is not very active yet... but I'm looking forward to exchanging experiences and ideas with JGC diesel owners in the future.

There are reasons why over 50% of new cars sold in Europe are diesel. Including Jeeps. #1 reason economy. And this doesn't even touch on Bio-diesel Mandates.

LOL... you don't need to strain yourself over the math. For the majority of people, simple math will show that the cost per mile doesn't justify it.

The people who truly want one will get one regardless of that reality.
 

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First: I like Bio-diesel and have made enough off my shares in DAR (Darling International) to pay for half my upcoming Diesel powered vehicle purchase.
Second: using the miles i have towed over the last three years for calculation I could have saved a conservative 3800 dollars which is more than the extra 2500 for the diesel.
Third: I am retiring, selling my house and business and dragging my wife my golden retriever and chihuahua into the sunset in what I hope to be a good five year trip. At which time I plan to cover a lot of miles and not all of it will be flat.

This vehicle is not for every one.... But if I should go to a dealer for diesel JGC and end driving away in an off the lot Gasser I promise that I will not revisit this forum in an attempt to turn sour grapes into wine.

Te MSRP on the Limited 4x2 that I want is 43,000. Your Overland starts at 50,000. That's already 7 grand more and it's not even diesel.

Also the difference between The "flexfuel" V8 version and the diesel I want is less than 2000 dollars. I have never put less than 100,000 miles on a vehicle. That's less than 2 cents a mile.... even if I didn't think I was going to recoup it on the cost of fuel the towing abilities of diesel would be well worth the 2 cents.

One other thing... I'm a 3rd year baby boomer... 1st ones turned 66 last year. 2nd wave this year. Me next year. We are selling our Motorcycles and moving on to campers in record numbers. I am far from unique.
 
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