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Discussion Starter #1
Anybody got any thoughts? I've been reading all over other diesel forums, mainly with the full size trucks since there are so many diesel engines there. Some people call it flat out snake oil, others think it can't hurt. I've put the Power Service Diesel Kleen+Cetane Boost in 2 tanks so far. Certainly can't tell any difference in performance. I figure, nothing in the Jeep info says to not do it, just says supplements aren't necessary. If it can improve mileage a tad by increase cetane numbers, and if it can actually increase lubricity of the fuel to get more life out of the injectors, why not. Curious to see if anyone else had any thoughts or plans to use it.
 

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I have owned several diesel vehicles since 1985 , 2 VW and 1 Ford PSD, the only additive I have used is Anti-gel when I know the temps will be in the 20's or below.
 

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I'm coming for a gas background and running BMW's where I have used the LiquiMoly like jetron (injector cleaner) and valve cleaner every tune-up, the Valve Cleaner or vente Sauber has saved a few friends from engine rebuilds or upper engine rebuilds as it cleans them out around 300K km etc. So I see they have some diesel additives, but I have no idea about diesel. So what is Anti-Gel? I'm a little concerned with water in the fuel and it's another balmy -18 celcius here in Toronto.
 

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I have used the Power Service Diesel in the white bottle for every single fill up I have made since new in my 2011 VW TDI. Power Service White is an Anti-Gel, Cetane Improver, and a Lubricity improver. It does help remove water from the system also. After changing my fuel filter at 40K miles, I saw no metal flakes in the filter housing or the filter itself. That motor and its fuel system is not tolerant of poor fuel quality. I do believe that this has helped my vehicle and I will continue to use it in the New Jeep if/when I get it.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Been using the Power Service in the silver bottle - we're in VA, not much need for the antigel supplement. I definitely couldn't say I notice any difference at all, just hoping it is helpful over the long haul. The only down side is having to just deal with the supplement, just one more thing to fiddle with at the pump and you don't want to spill it, not a pleasant odor. But I think it's going to be a part of the regular routine, seems like there is no downside other than having to buy it.
 

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The biggest thing to keep in mind when deciding to use or not use the supplements is when they changed from Highway Diesel to ULSD, they cut out a good portion of the carbon which lubricates the engine. I have used Standyne which is pricey, but seems to work no better than Power Service. Also keep in mind where you get your diesel... do they sell alot of it? Is it quality? Do they add antigel?

When it comes down to it, as you well know that if you take care of your diesel it will run forever!!! It's worth the lost cost of the supplement. Just my opinion.
 

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Been using the Power Service in the silver bottle - we're in VA, not much need for the antigel supplement. I definitely couldn't say I notice any difference at all, just hoping it is helpful over the long haul. The only down side is having to just deal with the supplement, just one more thing to fiddle with at the pump and you don't want to spill it, not a pleasant odor. But I think it's going to be a part of the regular routine, seems like there is no downside other than having to buy it.
Wouldn't the use of an anti-gel make more sense in an our like Va since our diesel probably isn't winterized for cold weather?
 

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As a former Tanker Driver, at least in upstate NY, diesel usually starts getting winterized at the end of October and then through the end of April. most USA made Diesel does not meet European Diesel Specifications. So most of the manufacturers have to beef up certain parts of the fuel system to cope with poor quality diesel. I know one thing that VW did with their systems is to mount the fuel filter up in the engine bay so it starts getting heat to it from the engine. And then it also recycles fuel back to the tank in certain conditions, hence warming up the diesel in the tank.

I work in the Auto Parts retail arena now and just this last week had some really bad Snows come though the Buffalo-Batavia area of NY. We had many MANY Big rig drivers coming to us for any and all anti-gel products we had and we sold out quickly. I asked about it and some of the more senior drives stated that when the fuel up down south, most of the diesel is NOT treated and they have problems when they get a Northern route if they don't put a treatment in.
 

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There is a garage in Alexandria off General Washington Blvd...(Edsall Rd)
 

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As per your owners manuel: I recommend nothing but fresh diesel.

Ensure you get your fuel from a station with high turn over of fuel (truck stops).

And change your fuel filters as scheduled.

You should be fine.

Have owned 2(two) jeeps and 2(two) Rams, all with diesels, nothing else has been required.

But I change my fuel filters regularly and earlier than required.

Not much earlier; but they are changed.
 
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